Can someone identify and price please?

I’ve been having quite a bit of trouble locating any information on these bottles. I purchased them at an estate sale.

they measure 7” tall.

amber glass.

marked .999 fine silver.

Let me know if you need any more information or fruit photographs to help identify these.

Any information is greatly appreciated, thank you


Comments

  • The form is of a handled bocksbeutel, originally for a specific German wine ("Steinwein"), but adopted later for other wines elsewhere. These look like limited edition, perhaps amateur-decorated, decanters. value is in the glass, depending on age and condition, not in the decoration. If they are old, hand blown bottles, they might be worth less than $25 each.

  • edited July 23


  • i found this https://sha.org/bottle/liquor.htm

    if you scroll all the way to the bottom, you will see it

  • Good information, ryanwill. Here it is:

    The handled bottle pictured to the left is also of late 19th century European (most likely German) manufacture, has a silver covered cork (cork in place and not visible), and includes sterling silver appliqué features which notes its intended use for Scotch whisky. This one has an applied glass handle which is also covered by sterling silver. This bottle has an applied champagne finish (a transition ridge where the applied finish glass is attached to the cracked-off neck can be felt inside the bore), was blown in a two-piece cup-bottom mold, and has no evidence of mold air venting. Being European in origin, the dating trends noted on this website do not work well with this bottle (or its olive green sister above). The general shape and design of these latter two bottles was a relatively common late 19th century (1880s to early 1900s) type. The large majority of these type bottles found in the U. S. (like these two examples) are believed to have been imported from Europe (Thomas 2002; empirical observations). These bottles also pretty much mark the end of handled mouth-blown liquor bottles.

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